Fantastic Feasts and Where to Find Them: Garlic Bread

Hey guys and welcome to an exciting new addition to Fantastic Feasts and Where to Find Them. I’m your host fenrir and I have a confession to make: I’m in lesbians love with garlic bread. It’s like, a guilty pleasure. I can eat that stuff every day and every night. It’s an easy party pleaser and you can downsize it and upgrade it as needed to feed a crowd or for yourself if you really want to go in solo-nomming style.

And it might be the subliminal messages from watching Scott Pilgrim vs. the World last night but man was I craving garlic bread.

Soooo without further ado here is my solution to some really good, unfussy garlic bread.

Oh and remember kids, bread does make you fat and this recipe really isn’t for those watching their waistlines (You all have been warned).

Okay.

So you think that after watching Michael Cera prance around for an hour or so I’d feel anything but hungry for food, let alone garlic bread, but there really, really is great power in suggestion. And come on, that bread joke doesn’t get old (At least, for me, and maybe that says something more about my  terrible humor).

So what is it about garlic bread that makes it amazing and crave-worthy? If you’re into garlic, and if you’re into butter — copious amounts of butter — and if you’re into bread then really, there’s no way you can go wrong. Of course sub-par varieties do exist, as do buttery, garlicky offerings that seem to have descended from the gods themselves; my ideal garlic bread has got that crunch from the oven, but is oozing with butter-garlic goodness. So it’s got nice crisp edges with quite a crunch, while the soft is luscious buttery pillows — sometimes loaded with cheese, even.

Also, a good garlic bread (For me) has to be able to stand on its own and not as a shovel for gravy but something that most also be savored, appreciated, honored on its own.

So that’s where this recipe comes from, although, I will say that unlike Mr. Pilgrim over here, this bread is not for the faint of heart and as my second and last warning I will say this: Please watch out, and don’t gasp at the amount of butter and olive oil that gets slathered onto these babies because it’s needed. Trust me.

Garlic Bread Recipe – the Cast of Characters:

  • One mini baguette -cut in half and then in quarters
  • Good butter, the best you can find and afford; I used Kerrygold Irish Butter and man was it worth it
  • Garlic – peeled and diced
  • Some olive oil
  • Optional: Cheese

Okay so first crank up your oven to 350 degrees. Then cut your bread in half, then cut into quarters so you have four nice pieces of bread. Now liberally — and yes I am using the word liberally — butter your bread. You want to butter it as much as your conscious will allow because magical things will happen once we throw it into the oven to crisp up and so that the butter can melt and ooze into every nook and cranny. I mean, just look at this helpful diagram below — that’s butter everywhere and I’m serious about that.

Once the oven is nice and toasty pop in your bread and wait for the butter to melt and brown a little, about five to six minutes. Then take it out and drizzle on some olive oil, followed by a blast of garlic — and if you’re really feeling in the mood for something good (without a guilty conscious), throw on some cheese. (I prefer it plain with just the garlic but my guests demanded cheesey goodness)

Now crank up the heat to 400 degrees and throw in your bread. Magic happens in about ten minutes and then when you open the door your simple bread, butter, and garlic mixture has suddenly evolved into my kind of garlic bread.

Crisp with a nice bite on the outside, yet oh so soft and yielding in the middle, combined with the pungent bites of garlic (And for the cheesey ones, hints of cheese) — yeah that’s my kind of garlic bread. We took it outside to enjoy the nice spring-ish day and to wave tauntingly in the face of passerbys that we had garlic bread and they didn’t.

Tune in next week for another Fantastic Feast — now in a fully equipped kitchen and a relatively unlimited food budget, the possibilities for food and drink over the summer months are pretty much endless.

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Fenrir

A would-be anthropologist, writer, food historian, and professional glutton hoping to combine fandom with her love of food. Ever wondered what a nug tasted like? Is butterbeer alcoholic? If you've asked such questions and are already drooling at the thought of a big old plate of lembas bread, then you're in the right place

Latest posts by Fenrir (see all)

Fenrir

A would-be anthropologist, writer, food historian, and professional glutton hoping to combine fandom with her love of food. Ever wondered what a nug tasted like? Is butterbeer alcoholic? If you've asked such questions and are already drooling at the thought of a big old plate of lembas bread, then you're in the right place

2 Comments:

  1. I love garlic bread…. *drool*

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