Review: Modern Warfare 3

Welcome Moar Powah! To the very first SIYM Double Feature! Or should I say . . . “Watch as SIYM1207 desperately tries to play it off like he didn’t just screw up the launch of his very own Project Warpath and SIYM friday last week!” Seriously though, I apologize to anyone inconvenienced by the series of unfortunate events that involved ridiculous error messages and some truly unforeseeable circumstances. Now, back to business! Hope you guys enjoyed the above video (if you haven’t, do it now!) as it was supposed to be last Friday’s SIYM and is now a part of today’s Moar Powah review. Right below is the official review of Modern Warfare 3, I hope you guys like it!

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“Let’s do this . . .”

Modern Warfare 3 is the single greatest launch in video game history (#fact). Period. Nothing even comes close. I knew going into this review that it would be a challenge to properly formulate my opinion of this experience. Mainly because it’s so easy to let COD-rage wash over you and color your every opinion. If the introductory video above has made anything clear it should be this: Modern Warfare 3 is FRUSTRATING! Don’t believe me? Ask the critics. Despite the intense swelling of emotions that come from playing Call of Duty games, I present to you an objective take on the franchise’s latest and greatest!

How the hell are you supposed to shop here?

When it comes to presentation, Call of Duty does it better than anyone. As ridiculous as some of the set pieces may seem, it’s hard to deny how entertaining and immersive the game is. From New York to France to some underground facility in the middle of nowhere to even barrel-rolling Air Force One, MW3 sucks you in and assaults your senses again and again. Unfortunately, such a tried-and-true approach suffers from being a bit overused, amongst even the most awesome moments the game has to offer. On multiple occasions, I found myself thinking “hmm, that building sure looks familiar” and shortly thereafter I noticed “hey, COD 4, get outta here! . . . oh wait, it’s MW3.” While few would list such repetitions as positives, the recurring themes of Call of Duty started to become so obvious that I was convinced that the developers were doing this on purpose. Ya know, an homage to the series. Kind of like a “Greatest Hits of Modern Warfare” compilation. In short, from the explosive intro to the epic finale, you’d be hard-pressed to find a more appropriate reaction than “Wow!”

“Overlord, the noobs have been neutralized.”

How’s the gameplay? Well, did you play MW2? Yeah, pretty much that. To be fair, there are lots of little tweaks here and there that keep the experience fresh and engaging but the experience is essentially the same as it’s always been. Smooth 60 fps, spot-on controls, and huge moments that are just as easily performed as they are to get lost in and fail hard. Formulaic doesn’t even begin to describe how predictable the gunplay is. Run here…duck here…shoot there…avoid grenade…breach this door…avoid helicopter…breach another door…damn I died. As mentioned before, the action is still fresh enough to compensate for the game’s repetitive shortcomings. The enormity of the battles really keeps you on your toes. However, the real question begs to ask how exactly the Call of Duty developers will move forward after this.

Can’t we just talk this over?

What more can be said about the graphics? It looks and plays exactly like MW2. Whether you call that a bad thing or not is totally up to the player. I found MW2’s presentation to be great and hardly in need of an upgrade. It would have been nice to have seen some significant enhancements but, alas, what you see is what you get in MW3. The same slick look as before but now with thrice the scope of action. It should be noted how impressive it is for this game to be running a solid 60 fps despite the huge moments that occur. Silky presentation and colorful visuals help solidify this title as very good-looking.

The city that never sleeps . . . I can imagine

How’s it sound? Loud. Very loud. Loud and proud. Hoorah! From beginning to end, the sound of gunfire and team chatter will dominate your eardrums. Thankfully, the soundtrack (voices and effect) is extremely well done and does a competent job of making the experience that much more epic. It’s kind of hard to truly analyze all the bells and whistles of MW3’s audio package since most of it is drowned out by the ludicrously overwhelming sounds of machine guns and explosions. Still, it is a war game and on that note the game stays very true to honoring that atmosphere. I especially admire the intensity these voice actors work with to get across the desired emotions . . . even if it all just sounds like BLAM! and POW!

Eat. Sleep. Prestige.

Replayability? Absolutely. Despite my overly-obvious love for Mass Effect, there’s still no game that comes close to the amount of time I’ve put into the Call of Duty franchise. The multiplayer returns with the same insanely-deep and ultra-diverse player progression that COD fans have come to love over the years. The single-player is even more explosive with massive battles and moments you’ll want to re-live again and again. The spec ops missions return with even greater challenge and the addition of Survival mode (basically, Nazi zombies on steroids) completes this already incredible package with more reasons to play over and over than ever before. So, how was that for an “objective” review? Yeah, I know, not my best but the truth of the matter is that (no matter how devoted you may be to all things COD) this game could easily be renamed as “Modern Warfare 2: Part 2.” Again, not that it’s a bad thing, but the fact that the visual structure is strikingly similar to previous COD’s (especially MW2) doesn’t help ward off such comparisons. Even for a hardcore Modern Warfare fan like myself, it was simply impossible for me to play this game without thinking “gee, this all looks familiar.” Still, the other side of it all is that these recurring themes are just simply withstanding the test of time and are just too irresistible to leave to memory. No matter how you look at it, Modern Warfare 3 is indeed a hell of a ride. Easily one of the most action-packed games I’ve ever played and you’d be doing yourself a disservice to pass this beast up. Anyway, this is SIYM1207, hoping you guys enjoyed the review and look forward to tomorrow where I give my first impressions of Saint Row the Third!

-Fifth Fleet Out-

Rating Breakdown
Presentationwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Repetitive set pieces and familiar sights abound in this explosive-heavy installment of Modern Warfare.
Gameplaywww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Outside of a few mechanical upgrades and multiplayer enhancements, it's the same best-in-class controls you've come to know and love. No complaints
Graphicswww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
Looks just as impressive as it did in Modern Warfare 2. With that said, not much has changed. The 60 fps is still as sharp as ever.
Soundwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
When your ears are not being assaulted by gunfire, the competent lineup of voice acting and soundtrack will suck you right into the action.
Replayabilitywww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
If you love multiplayer, good luck putting this game down. The addition of challenging spec ops missions and Survival mode makes this package had to resist.
Overallwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.comwww.dyerware.com
While this won't win over any nay-sayers, Call of Duty fans and anyone remotely interested in a good shooter will find a lot to like here.
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One Comment:

  1. The screaming fanboys will never admit that they have been playing the same game for a good 3-4 years.

    Also: I had no where else to mention this: I met Fakku's Jacob once

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